What Are You Scared Of? - Open Adoption Roundtable #31

The Open Adoption Roundtable is a series of occasional writing prompts about open adoption. It's designed to showcase of the diversity of thought and experience in the open adoption community. You don't need to be listed at Open Adoption Bloggers to participate or even be in a traditional open adoption. If you're thinking about openness in adoption, you have a place at the table. The prompts are meant to be starting points--please feel free to adapt or expand on them.

Write a response at your blog--linking back here so your readers can browse other participating blogs--and share your post in the comments here. Using a previously published post is fine; I'd appreciate it if you'd add a link back to the roundtable. If you don't blog, you can always leave your thoughts directly in the comments.


 Let's start with the one thing I'm not scared of.  I'm not scared that C will decide she wants to parent. It seems that's the first question on everyone's mind when we had been waiting and even once we brought Baby X home.  Honestly, I have better things to be scared of.

I'm scared of being proactive and looking for diverse schools for Baby X, or a church where he's surrounded by people who look more like him than us.  Typical introvert that I am.  

I'm scared of telling him his story.  Every adoption has a sad story, and Baby X is no exception.  Certain elements of his story are going to be difficult to discuss and explain. 


I'm scared of losing contact with C.  Our adoption is currently semi-open, and she's receiving on-going counseling so it makes it easy for us to set up meetings.  S and I both get antsy when a couple months have gone by and we haven't heard about a meeting time.  Granted, it's only been a few months, but being the type of personalities we both are, we like to have a plan.  It's probably an indication that it's time to be more open and start communicating without the agency go-between.  

That's pretty much it.  Everything else that scares me is standard parenting stuff.